Archive for the ‘Entertainment’ Category

R.I.P. Prince Rogers Nelson (June 7, 1958 – April 21, 2016)

You lived that POP LIFE and I simply ADORE you. When I first heard your song KISS in my LITTLE RED CORVETTE it made me want to throw on my RASBERRY BERET. Now your gone and all your fans are DELIRIOUS and say TAKE ME WITH U or screaming LET’S GO CRAZY. Some even say no I WOULD DIE 4 U, but instead I chose to party like it is 1999 in the PURPLE RAIN. But the CONTROVERSY will die down and THE MORNING PAPERS will stop writing stories about youu, I know you have moved on up those MOUNTAINS cause U GOT THE LOOK and AMERICA will GET OFF this and move onto something else. But we all know this was the day WHEN DOVES CRY!

Prince

Prince

Prince was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and developed an interest in music at an early age, writing his first song at age seven. After recording songs with his cousin’s band 94 East, 19-year-old Prince recorded several unsuccessful demo tapes before releasing his debut album For You in 1978, under the guidance of manager Owen Husney. His 1979 album Prince went platinum due to the success of the singles “Why You Wanna Treat Me So Bad?” and “I Wanna Be Your Lover”. His next three records—Dirty Mind (1980), Controversy (1981), and 1999 (1982)—continued his success, showcasing Prince’s trademark of prominently sexual lyrics and incorporation of elements of funk, dance, and rock music. In 1984, he began referring to his backup band as The Revolution and released Purple Rain, which served as the soundtrack to his film debut of the same name. A prolific songwriter, Prince in the 1980s wrote songs for and produced work by many other acts, often under pseudonyms.

R.I.P. Shirley Temple Black (born Shirley Temple; April 23, 1928 – February 10, 2014)

Shirley TempleTemple began her film career in 1932 at the age of three and, in 1934, found international fame in Bright Eyes, a feature film designed specifically for her talents. She received a special Juvenile Academy Award in February 1935 for her outstanding contribution as a juvenile performer to motion pictures during 1934, and film hits such as Curly Top and Heidi followed year after year during the mid-to-late 1930s. Licensed merchandise that capitalized on her wholesome image included dolls, dishes, and clothing. Her box office popularity waned as she reached adolescence, and she left the film industry in her teens. She appeared in a few films of varying quality in her mid-to-late teens, and retired completely from films in 1950 at the age of 22. She was the top box-office draw four years in a row (1935–38) in a Motion Picture Herald poll.

R.I.P. Tom “Billy Jack” Laughlin (August 10, 1931 – December 12, 2013)

Tom Laughlin

Tom Laughlin

Los Angeles (CNN) — Tom Laughlin, the actor who wrote and starred in the “Billy Jack” films of the 1970s, died Thursday, his family confirmed Sunday. He was 82.

Laughlin’s Billy Jack character was a heroic Native American ex-Army Green Beret who used his karate skills to fight racism and oppression.

The second of the series — titled “Billy Jack” — was a low-budget independent film that became a box-office blockbuster in 1971. Laughlin’s vigilante character defends a counterculture “Freedom School” from townspeople who harass and discriminate against the Native American students.

The film was criticized by those who saw its central theme as a message that violence was an answer to injustice.

Laughlin resorted to renting theaters himself to show the film after Hollywood studios refused to distribute it.

The Billy Jack character first appeared in “The Born Losers” in 1967, fighting a motorcycle gang. Laughlin co-wrote and directed the film.

Laughlin later attempted a political career, putting his name on presidential primary ballots in 1992, 2004 and 2008.

Laughlin’s acting career began with TV and film roles in the 1950s, including a “lover boy” role in Sandra Dee’s 1959 beach movie “Gidget.”

His wife of 60 years, Delores Taylor, also acted in his “Billy Jack” films.

Laughlin died near his Thousand Oaks, California, home Thursday, his family said.

He is survived by his wife, three children and five grandchildren.

 

My Favorite part of Billy Jack